15 May 2017

BY: Amhf

Couple Counselling / Depression / Treatment

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A Few Words about Depress Therapy for Couples

Couples therapy, especially when addressing depression, plays a pivotal role in enhancing the well-being of both individuals and the relationship as a whole. Depression can have a profound impact on couples, straining communication, intimacy, and overall connection. Here are a few key points about depression therapy for couples:

  1. Shared Understanding: Depression therapy provides a platform for couples to understand the intricacies of depression and its effects on each partner. This shared understanding helps to foster empathy and reduces misunderstandings.
  2. Effective Communication: Couples struggling with depression often face challenges in communication. Therapy equips partners with tools to communicate openly, express emotions, and actively listen to one another.
  3. Joint Coping Strategies: Therapists help couples develop coping strategies that can be applied collectively to manage depressive episodes. These strategies may include stress reduction techniques, daily routines, and lifestyle adjustments.
  4. Individual Support: While therapy focuses on the relationship, it also acknowledges each individual’s unique experiences with depression. Partners learn how to support each other’s personal journeys and offer encouragement.
  5. Rebuilding Intimacy: Depression can erode intimacy. Therapy guides couples in rebuilding emotional and physical intimacy by addressing barriers, creating safe spaces, and nurturing connection.
  6. Conflict Resolution: Couples often experience increased conflict due to depression-related stressors. Therapy teaches conflict resolution skills, allowing partners to address disagreements in a healthier and more productive manner.
  7. Setting Realistic Expectations: Depression therapy assists couples in setting realistic expectations for each other during difficult times. Partners learn to support without unrealistic demands or pressures.
  8. Long-Term Relationship Strengthening: The tools acquired during depression therapy can extend beyond the immediate challenges. Couples gain insights that enhance the overall quality and longevity of their relationship.
  9. Professional Guidance: Therapists provide a neutral and professional perspective. They offer guidance, strategies, and insights that partners might not have considered on their own.
  10. Hope and Resilience: Depression therapy instills a sense of hope and resilience within the relationship. Couples learn that, with dedication and effort, they can navigate the challenges of depression and emerge stronger together.

Ultimately, depression therapy for couples aims to create a supportive, understanding, and resilient partnership. By addressing depression as a team, couples can build a foundation of communication, empathy, and mutual support that benefits both their individual well-being and the health of their relationship.

25 Mar 2016

BY: Amhf

Projects

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Global MINDS @ Western Summer Institute – Kenya 2017

Global MINDS @ Western is an Interdisciplinary Development Initiative of Western University, Canada with the objective of using social innovation approaches to catalyze the development, implementation, mobilization and evaluation of disruptive solutions for the wicked problem of reducing the global burden of mental disorders and related issues (e.g., suicide). Global MINDS is focused on innovating for low resource settings in low and middle income countries (LMIC) (e.g., East Africa region) and for marginalized communities within Canada. Through transdisciplinary collaboration and innovative pedagogy, we empower students and faculty to lead change and make a lasting impact starting now.

Global Minds – Africa Mental Health Foundation 01 Jul 2015

BY: Amhf

Projects

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MULTI-SECTORAL STAKEHOLDER TEAM APPROACH TO SCALE-UP COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH IN KENYA: BUILDING ON LOCALLY-GENERATED EVIDENCE AND LESSONS LEARNED (TEAM)

TEAM aims to effectively integrate mental health services with minimal expenditure of resources, into pre-existing, community-based, government funded, formal and informal health services in Kenya. The project is currently taking place in Makueni County an area without a single psychiatrist. TEAM’s main course is to strengthen effective, self-driven leadership and governance, and to provide comprehensive community mental health awareness to impact on attitude and behavioral change in the community.

liptik-pic-1 01 Feb 2015

BY: Amhf

Projects

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The LIPTK Project

Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR) provides support to promote successful recovery, community reintegration and improved quality of life for people living with a mental illness or mental health concerns. With increase in income through either entrepreneurship or employment, people who are predominantly exposed to various forms of stigma find an avenue to interact with communities and command recognition and respect.

Sustainable and adapted treatment 01 Jan 2014

BY: Amhf

Projects

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THE COMPUTER-BASED DRUG AND ALCOHOL TRAINING ASSESSMENT IN KENYA (eDATA K)

The purpose of this project was to answer the challenge of integration of screening and core packages of mental health and substance use disorder services into routine primary health care through innovative e-learning technologies. eDATA K aimed to correct these problems by adapting NextGenU.org`s high-quality, globally-available, free-to-use, and low-cost to assemble, computer, peer-, and mentor-supported learning to build the capacity to provide substance use disorder screening and core services in primary care, as a first step toward building the capacity to address other mental health conditions. This particular project also included a course on quality improvement and leadership to help support practitioners in integrating those new services into their current clinical practice.

Project Results and Impacts:

On healthcare workers

  • More than 400 health care workers involved withabout halfof them completing the course on their own time, a very large completion rate compared to < 1% average completion rate for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).
  • Significant reduction or stigmatizing attitudes among health care workers towards people with alcohol and other substance use disorders
  • Widely reported acceptability and usefulness of the courses amongst health care workers

“It has helped me because in the beginning before I was trained I was not comfortable living with those people who use these substances like alcohol. But nowadays I can talk to them comfortably and make them understand their problem and how they can deal with it”

On patients

  • 22,327 patients reached with screening for alcohol, tobacco and other substance use, BMI and physical activity during the study enrolment period – showing acceptability and feasibility
  • 1,212 (5.5%) patients identified as having moderate to high risk levels of alcohol use
  • Over half of them, i.e. 609 (50.2%), received brief intervention for risky alcohol use and the rest received feedback and written advice
  • Follow-up assessments conducted at 1,3, and 6 months with a follow up rate of 83.2% at 6 months
  • Significant reduction in alcohol use amongst those who received the screening and feedback as well as those who received the full brief intervention, demonstrated up to 6 months post intervention; with a larger decrease in alcohol consumption than in other brief intervention trials.
  • Positive changes in self-reported quality of life domains in nearly half of the participants
  • A 60% decrease in depression score between baseline and 6 months amongst all participants in the two groups
  • An overall decrease in risk scores from consumption of substances based on the ASSIST from baseline to 6 months; in public facilities 74% for tobacco; 88% for alcohol; 34% for cannabis; and 47% for amphetamine-type substances (khat being the most prevalent of these substances in Kenya). In private facilities, 84% reported a decreased score for tobacco, 97% for alcohol; 45% for cannabis; and 65% for amphetamine-type substances.
  • High acceptability of the intervention among beneficiaries

“Since I was married, I had never had a child with my husband that is why am saying it (alcohol) is very bad. We have stayed for long without me getting pregnant. I have been drinking a lot. After I joined this study, I stopped completely taking alcohol and I became pregnant immediately. This child I am holding here is as a result of this study.”

On the healthcare system

  • 60 health workers completed the four modular online practice improvement course blended with the Institute of Health Care Improvement Open School courses
  • The quality improvement and leadership course was effective in supporting the integration of screening and intervention in practice in public facilities, with 12,369 screens and 1,553 Brief Interventions done post randomized control trial, without any financial incentives for performing those interventions as part of research
  • For the first time, the Makueni County Government allocated resources for mental health activities
  • The Makueni County Government included substance use interventions in their performance appraisal process
  • National Ministry of Health is ready to use the training and interventions to advocate for increased budgetary support for mental health and substance use intervention activities
Team project 01 Nov 2013

BY: Amhf

Projects

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The DIALOGUE Project

DIALOGUE was a project that sought to empower, supervise, support and include informal traditional and faith healers to deliver evidence based mhGAP-IG adapted psycho-social interventions to reduce mental health treatment gap in Kenya.

DIALOGUE discovered that traditional and faith healers (the clergy) and formal health care workers can collaborate successfully in providing mental health services in rural communities with limited access to specialist care. The study also proved that trained traditional and faith healers can effectively screen and make referrals of cases of depression to primary healthcare.

The mhGAP-IG mHealth Project 01 Nov 2013

BY: Amhf

Projects

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The mhGAP-IG mHealth Project

mHealth was a project that aimed at evaluating the applicability of a model that utilized mobile technology to train, supervise, support and monitor application of mhGAP-IG depression module on non-mental health workers.

mHealth successfully developed and utilized a mobile phone application software version of the WHO Mental Health Treatment Gap Intervention Guide (mhGAP-IG), to screen and manage depression in patients attending four rural health centers.

Mobile Substance Use Intervention for HIV Prevention 01 Sep 2013

BY: Amhf

Projects

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Mobile Substance Use Intervention for HIV Prevention

Mobile Substance Use Intervention for HIV Prevention

BY: Amhf

Projects

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Identification of Psychosis-Risk Traits in Africa

Identification of Psychosis-Risk Traits in Africa

01 Sep 2012

BY: Amhf

Projects

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The e-DATA K Project

THE COMPUTER-BASED DRUG AND ALCOHOL TRAINING ASSESSMENT IN KENYA (eDATA K)

e-DATA K was a project that provided online training to both clinical and non-clinical health workers to acquire competencies adapted from WHO Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) and the WHO ASSIST.

  • Africa Mental Health Foundation and NextGenU.org have now shown the feasibility of using online learning to train health workers in practice even in rural areas of Kenya.
  • The merits of this model of online training include that it is free, provides convenient access, and is effective in improving the competencies of health workers.
  • The screening and interventions (learned from the AMHF and NextGenU.org training) are highly effective, leading to very significant decrease in consumption of alcohol and improved functioning among the more than 1200 patients included in the study.
  • The clinical leaders in one of the districts also received a quality improvement online course, which led them to sustain the screening and brief interventions in their regular practice even after the end of the randomized control trial.
    Background The Computer-Based Drug and Alcohol Training Assessment in Kenya (eDATA K) project provided online training to both clinical and non-clinical health workers to acquire competencies adapted from the WHO Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) and the WHO ASSIST manuals with the goals of helping them to:
    -Identify those with SUD
  • Provide ethical and non-judgmental care to those with SUD
  • Use clinical brief intervention techniques
  • Provide basic psychological and pharmaceutical treatment
  • Identify and assist in managing co-morbidities
  • Assist patients and families with self-help strategies
  • Determine the need for, and feasibility of, referral